English 203: Class Blog

Class Blog Assignment Sheet and Guidelines

The gist:

As our syllabus makes clear, the study of literature is best undertaken through constant discussion. The more we talk, write, and converse about things we’re reading, the more nuanced our understanding of the text. The class blog is a place to continue our in-class discussions of the texts we’re reading and their contexts. You’ll have to complete a total of five blog entries this semester, staggered throughout the semester with due dates indicated here and on the syllabus. Find the prompts for each post below.

How to get the most out of the blog?

The goal of a blog is to publish your thoughts and ideas about literature for a larger audience than just yourself. In this case, our blog is private—only people invited to the blog can read it. But that means that you have an audience of 36 people, all of whom are reading the same texts and thinking about similar ideas. One way that we can make literature come to life is to find connections between texts and our day-to-day lives. As such, that will be one goal of the blog. You’ll find that some entries require you to do a bit of cultural research and to post an item you find that relates in some way to our readings and class discussions. This can be anything: a facebook page, a new article, interesting biographical information about the author, a painting, a youtube video, a poem, among others. You have free reign to be creative and even weird with your posts, as long as you make clear how this item relates to the text we’re reading or discussions we’re having. You’ll pair this item with a few sentences explaining how you see a connection, and how that in some way helps us to understand a text more fully or in a new light.

Expectations:

Blog entries are due by Friday at 5 during five weeks in the semester. Late entries receive no credit. Similarly, if you attempt to upload an entry before the week it is due, it will receive no credit. Each post is worth 1.5% points. If you follow the prompt and put thought into your post, you’ll receive full credit. You must also comment on at least one of your peers’ posts to receive the remaining .5% for that week. Comments must be substantive: this means you can’t just say, “oh, I like this!” or “I don’t see how this relates.” Comments must ADD to the discussion.

ME:

I will also be participating in the class blog. This means I’ll be posting entries and comments right along with you.

Prompts:

Prompt 1 (DUE week 2): In our current day, where do you see similar issues happening that Gaines writes about in A Lesson Before Dying? Provide a link or an anecdote and explain how what you post relates to issues or themes in the novel.

-Provide at least one comment on a peer’s post: be sure that comment adds to the      discussion in some way

Prompt 2 (DUE week 4): Find a pop culture example you think relates to The Epic of Gilgamesh in some way. Provide a link or a detailed explanation, and be sure to explain how it relates to the text.

– Provide at least one comment on a peer’s post: be sure that comment adds to the discussion in some way

Prompt 3 (DUE week 7): Post the passage you’re focusing on for project 2 and explain to the class the literary devices or elements you plan to write about. Include your revised thesis statement at the end of the post.

– Provide at least one comment on a peer’s post: be sure that comment adds to the discussion in some way

Prompt 4 (DUE week 10): Often, when we think of monsters, we think of supernatural creatures. But Lindquist’s Let the Right One In demonstrates that sometimes the most monstrous of people are very, very real people. Find an example of a “monster” or something “monstrous” in culture that we don’t typically think of as a “monster,” and relate it in some way to Lindquist’s novel.

– Provide at least one comment on a peer’s post: be sure that comment adds to the discussion in some way

Prompt 5 (DUE week 14): Write a blog post where you talk about the process of writing project 3. What is it like to have to use personal evidence to make an analytical argument? How is this process teaching you something about yourself or about the study of literature?

– Provide at least one comment on a peer’s post: be sure that comment adds to the discussion in some way

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